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I Think I'd Prefer Philadelphia


Sometimes you get on a plane to escape. When we left for APEX, We were gladly escaping the horrifically cold and snowy weather in the Northeast and heading for the sunny climes of Southern California. It was a welcome relief from subzero weather and snowed-in streets and highways. While ...

Anyone for Surface Noise?


Back in the middle 1960s, there was a lot of talk about creating digital audio. At the time, there were at least three major roadblocks to making this happen: appropriate media, hardware, and basic knowledge. The only digital media that worked was high-speed magnetic tape. There was ...

How Far We've Come!


It was 30 years ago that U.S. Tech first appeared as Mid-Atlantic Tech, a 12-page tabloid on newsprint with ink that came off on your hands. The paper concentrated on publicizing companies in the Mid-Atlantic region. The paper grew each month, by dint of hard work ...

Supply Chain and Onshoring

As 2014 winds down, we find that we have barely enough time to even take a deep breath, because an early IPC APEX Expo is nearly upon us, scheduled for San Diego, one of our very favorite trade show cities. And just two weeks before that will be ATX West/MD&M et al exhibiting in Anaheim. This ...

The Biggest and the Best. . .

I have always had a soft spot for technology trade shows. I have fond memories of the IEEE Show presented at the New York Coliseum and the exhibition areas of 6 or 7 nearby hotels. I was a neophyte associate editor of an electronics trade magazine, and even then, in the early 1960s, the NY Coliseum ...

Remember V-Mail?

You have to be pretty old to remember V-Mail ("V" for Victory), and I guess I qualify. During World War II, when nearly everything was in short supply and either rationed or simply not available, the U.S. Post Office hit upon a novel way of sending huge quantities of personal letters between our servicemen ...

Supply Chain Economics

As this year winds down, we are busily planning for 2015. We have already published our Editorial Schedule for next year, and now we are looking forward to bringing to our readers a new special page: a monthly column that deals with and is entitled Supply Chain.

Is E-Gaming in Your Future?


It's all about money. It's all about gaming. It's all about losing domestic jobs because of technology. Or is it because of competition? The upsurge is in e-gaming, virtual gaming courtesy of the cloud, and it has been growing by leaps and bounds. One of the most tangible results is ...

Seeing the Future: Integrated Production Lines


We had the good fortune to attend a special press briefing for the new ASM SMT Solutions Segment, presented at the Siemens Elektronics Works in Amberg. A scenic drive through hops and corn fields brought us back to Munich and an afternoon at the SIPLACE factory. Our update of the newly ...

Our Global Promise

The electronics manufacturing industry is worldwide in nature, and U.S. Tech has followed it over the years, becoming as global as the industry itself. Today, our reach is more global than ever. We attend and provide product previews for such overseas shows as Nepcon South China (this issue ...

Saving the World, One Lunch at a Time

The talk in the room turned to the "Lake Effect" and to school snow days, and one new newspaper editor commented how the kids must love those snow days. It was in Cleveland, Ohio, and a school official finally said, "We try to never close the schools; if we do, a lot of kids won't eat." This quote appears ...

Is Every New U.S. Warplane a Boondoggle?

The news from Iraq is very disquieting — no, not disquieting, it's downright scary and frustrating. After so many years, so many American lives lost, and enormous amounts of money spent, the country is now being torn apart by sectarian civil war — and much of it in unison with the civil war in ...

See You on the Road

Solar has been a mixed bag for the last year. The business is on the upswing (see "Tech Watch" in this issue of U.S. Tech) as manufacturers gear up to meet the spiraling demand. U.S. companies are still struggling to match the lower-priced competition from China, which is largely subsidized ...

One Man's Poison. . .

I grew up in a rather picturesque mill town in Upstate New York, many, many years before manufacturers had to think about environmental issues. The entire county was given over to one principal industry — the manufacture of leather gloves — and the numerous leather tanneries that supported this ...

Wars Are Awfully Expensive

As our nation winds down from two wars in the wake of 9/11, our military is faced with inevitable spending cuts, as our armed forces transition from a wartime to a peacetime footing. Fighting a war is awfully expensive, and our national economy's lackluster performance is just one of the more visible ...

No Place Like It


Something very special happened just before and during the IPC APEX Expo: my son Josh and the other two hikers who had been prisoners in Iran for more than two years, went on a book tour to promote their new book, "A Sliver of Light." Many people on the APEX Show floor had seen them ...

Packrats Beware


I have a confession to make. I am a packrat. This can be dangerous because we live in a small house with very little space for storage. We have a storage shed behind our carport, but that's for things like the lawnmower, some yard tools, power tools and hardware. It's full, very full ...

There's a Flood in Your Future

To a visitor from another planet, it would become immediately obvious — we live on a water world. In fact, land makes up only about 30 percent of the Earth's surface. Seen from outer space, our world appears to be all blue, the color of the oceans. It is indeed ironic that the oceans, which percolated ...

What Happened to Analog?

Now that IPC/APEX is once again in Las Vegas (for two years) we have to look seriously at what the year ahead has in store for our industry. Business has never been better, the Dow has settled firmly in its new home above 16,000, and onshoring is alive and well in the USA.

Complicated Is Better

Walter Salm, Editor
The commercial jet that landed at the wrong airport recently, with a dangerously short runway, makes me wonder why the flight crew wasn't using the automated landing system that would have clued in the pilots very quickly that they were heading for the wrong airport. This kind of stupid error was just so easy to avoid because no one thought to use the automated system for the final approach. Visual flight rules were being used, and this is something that can be chancy at best, given our crowded and over-busy airports and metro areas.

 
 
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