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February '13: Traceability: All-Important for OEMs


Traceability should be required when an OEM chooses an EMS provider. Without traceability, there is no real way to perform a thorough defect analysis. In some instances a defect may appear to be an assembly issue, but once a date/lot code comparison across all affected serial numbers ...

April '12: Sandia: Working on the Bionic Man

Albuquerque, NM — Sandia National Laboratories researchers, using off-the-shelf equipment in a chemistry lab, have been working on ways to improve amputees' control over prosthetics with direct help from their own nervous systems.

May '12: Solar Powered Hydrogen Filling Station


Freiburg, Germany — The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy CF Systems inaugurated a solar hydrogen filling station in Freiburg on March 2. Sponsored by the Ministry of the Environment Baden-Wuerttemberg, the publicly accessible filling station serves not only as a demonstration platform but also represents a milestone in the development of a network of hydrogen filling stations being set up in the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg....

April '11:New Solar Cell Self-Repairs


West Lafayette, IN — Researchers are creating a new type of solar cell designed to self-repair like natural photosynthetic systems in plants by using carbon nanotubes and DNA, an approach aimed at increasing service life and reducing cost.
 
"We've created artificial photosystems using optical nanomaterials to harvest solar energy that is converted to electrical power," ...

October '10: U. of Texas & SPEA Open Test Lab on Campus

Tyler, TX — A new test and instructional center at the University of Texas in Tyler is being made possible by an endowment from Italian test equipment maker SPEA, which has its US headquarters here. The University of Texas at Tyler College of Engineering and Computer Science has received an endowment ...

March '10:Electric Cars: the Next 10 Years


A radical change in attitude to electric vehicles has occurred in 2009, resulting in huge new financing from governments and tough new laws that will boost sales. Now all car makers must offer electric versions in their lineups or face oblivion as governments finally get serious about ...

Feb '11: Extending Moore's Law with Epitaxial Graphene


Move over silicon. There's a new electronic material in town, and it goes fast. That material, the focus of the 2010 Nobel Prize in physics, is graphene — a fancy name for extremely thin layers of ordinary carbon atoms arranged in a "chicken-wire" lattice. These layers, sometimes, just a single atom thick, conduct electricity with virtually no resistance, very little heat generation — and less power consumption than silicon.

With silicon device fabrication approaching its physical limits, many researchers believe graphene can provide a new platform material that would allow the semiconductor industry to continue the march ...

September '11: Solar Cells Empower Tribal Energy

Albuquerque, NM — Most Americans take electric power for granted, but for thousands of people living on tribal lands, getting to the grid can be a challenge. A lack of infrastructure, transmission capabilities and policies impede the availability of electricity within the reservations and to outlying ...

September '13: ASM/SIPLACE Gets New Presence in Silicon Valley


ASM Assembly Systems (SIPLACE) has started a new chapter in its book of electronics growth with the official opening of its West Coast Technical Center at new partner Technica USA's facilities in San Jose, California. Technica came on board as the SIPLACE rep organization for Northern ...

May '10:Fuel Cell-Powered Mobile Lighting for Academy Awards

Livermore, CA — A team led by Sandia National Laboratories made a cameo appearance at the 82nd Annual Academy Awards® ceremony in Los Angeles. They didn't win any Oscars, but instead provided some fuel-cell powered outdoor lighting.
 
Sandia, The Boeing Company, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Altergy Systems, Multiquip Inc., and others developed a novel mobile lighting system...

September '10:Solar Energy Powers Remote African School

Lashaine, Northern Tanzania — It's an ongoing project, bringing the benefits of today's technology to a school in this remote village. The prime movers behind it are Engineers Without Borders Portland Professionals Chapter (EWB), and they traveled to Lashaine Village, Tanzania in June to oversee the expansion of a rainwater harvesting system and the installation of an expanded solar energy system at Orkeeswa Secondary School. The school ...

September 09 - Breakthrough May Bring New Gen PC Boards

Syracuse, NY — Circuit boards may get a whole new pedigree and production methodology because of an amazing discovery by PCB veteran Robert Tarzwell working in his laboratory at DMRPCB — literally a cottage industry site. It's the stuff of Silicon Valley garage startups: Tarzwell has made a momentous ...

August 09 - NIST: Passing the Neutron Science Torch

Gaithersburg, MD — What do the mystery of how proteins fold, the unexpected behavior of nanoparticles, and the key to making hydrogen fuel cells have in common? All can be investigated with beams of slow-moving neutrons — and scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST ...

July 09 - Graphene Nano Wires May Help IC Performance


Atlanta, GA — The unique properties of thin layers of graphite — known as graphene — make the material attractive for a wide range of potential electronic devices. Researchers have now experimentally demonstrated the potential for another graphene application: replacing copper ...

Dec '12: Quantum Computing Earns NIST Researcher Nobel Prize

Gaithersburg, MD — David J. Wineland, a physicist at the U.S. Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), has won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics. The honor is NIST's fourth Nobel prize in physics in the past 15 years. 
 
Wineland shared the prize with Serge Haroche of the College de France and Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, France. In announcing the winners, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited Wineland and Haroche "for groundbreaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems."

August '11: Sandia Sends Historic Robots to Smithsonian

Albuquerque, NM — In a nod to Sandia Labs' contributions to the field of robotics, the Smithsonian Institution has obtained nine of Sandia's historically significant robots for its permanent collection at the National Museum of American History.
 
"For the Smithsonian to request Sandia technology for their collections is an external recognition of the significance of Sandia National Laboratories' contributions to the nation," ...

May 11: Giving UAVs High Power, Wide Bandwidth


In the late 1950s, the U.S. Air Force began planning critical missions for reconnaissance without putting military personnel in the line of fire. That marked the beginning of the era of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Today, the Air Force has a fleet of 250 UAVs, with USAF Chief of ...

June 09 - Semicon Firms: Meeting Economic Challenges


When the global recession ends, the semiconductor industry will be a different world with different competitive dynamics and different priorities than when the recession began. Faced with this reality, semiconductor companies on the path to achieving high performance need to consider ...

December 09: Solar Energy Comes in Many Flavors


The U.S. rooftop solar industry is, at the moment, famously in a slump. When business picks up again, the U.S. will be in a position — perhaps — to begin to catch up with Europe in rooftop solar power generation.
Europe has the advantage of very generous governmental incentives for homeowners to install solar. As Raju Yenamandra, head of sales for North America for SolarWorld USA...

August '10:Zero Gravity Aids Workers, Wins Awards

Los Angeles, CA — We've all heard about zero gravity; the very phrase conjures up visions of astronauts floating while in orbit, or possibly a magician's assistant floating above a table on stage, or perhaps a high-speed monorail using Mag Lev technology to keep from touching the rail. It is certainly not an everyday occurrence, or at least it wasn't, until Equipois came along, but now perhaps it can be. The company has come up with a zero-G tool support  ...

 
 
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